Newly Planted Tree Leaves Turning Brown, Yellow or Wilting? Try…

Newly Planted Tree Leaves Turning Brown, Yellow or Wilting? Try…

Gently placed in its planting spot, sealed with soil and quenched with water–you can’t wait for your new tree to flourish!

But, after weeks of watching your tree soak in its brand-new life, you see... brown, yellow or wilted leaves?

When new trees have drooping or discolored leaves, there’s a problem. So, what can you do to help?

 


Why You’re Having Problems with Newly Planted Trees and What to Do

Adjusting to a new home is stressful for young trees. The sudden change in environment can lead to all sorts of problems, which is called transplant shock.

Transplant shock usually starts at the tree’s roots. Sometimes roots don’t have enough room to spread out or didn’t get enough water right after being planted. Whatever the case, trees wear their heart on their sleeve–or should we say their leaves. That’s why you see those wilted, yellow or brown leaves.

Is my newly planted tree dying?

You can often revive a shocked tree, but you’ll first need to make sure it’s alive and well.

  • Try bending a tree branch. If the tree’s dead, it will easily snap. Live tree twigs are nimble, so they’re flexible, bendable and much harder to break.
  • Or scratch a spot on the twig with your fingertip or a pocket knife. If the layer immediately under the bark is moist and bright green, the tree’s alive.

What to Do About Newly Planted Tree Leaves Wilting, Turning Yellow or Browning

Trees often suffer from transplant shock because their roots don’t have enough room to establish themselves.

Shocked trees also need a little TLC to get them back on track. Here are a few things you can try:

If those steps don’t appear to help your tree, consider replanting the tree in a larger hole. First, read this guide about transplanting trees. If you’re unsure if your tree needs moved, ask an arborist. Replanting your tree again could shock it once more.

Learn more about how to set your new tree up for success here!

  • The Tree Doctor September 4, 2018 >Hi Lance, Trees typically lose a large percentage of their roots during the digging and transplanting process. Following leaf-out, the reduced root system can often struggle to provide the moisture needed by the foliage, especially during periods of high summer temperatures. To conserve moisture, the tree often shuts down some of the foliage to reduce water demands. Because your tree was recently planted, this is a distinct possibility as to why your tree is dropping some foliage. If you want to be 100% sure this is what is happening, I would contact a certified arborist and have them come out and inspect the trees. You can contact your local Davey Tree office directly at (303) 515-7493. You can also fill out a quick consultation form on their local webpage here: http://www.davey.com/local-offices/englewood-tree-service/. Best of luck to you, Lance.
  • Lance Smith August 31, 2018 >I planted 2 maple trees 3 months ago 1 in a grass area on a hill that one started out great, had lots of new growth , but now looks like it’s dead all the leaves or turning yellow and brown and drying up and falling off .The soil is really sandy but very hard could this be the problem? Is there something that I can do to loosen the soil deep by the roots?
  • The Tree Doctor August 8, 2018 > Hi Leonard, Trees typically lose a large percentage of their roots during the digging and transplanting process. Following leaf-out, the reduced root system can often struggle to provide the moisture needed by the foliage, especially during periods of high summer temperatures. To conserve moisture, the tree often shuts down some of the foliage to reduce water demands. Because your tree was recently planted, this is a distinct possibility as to why your tree is dropping some foliage. I still would recommend contacting a certified arborist and having them come out to inspect the tree. They will be able to provide an accurate diagnosis and prescribe the appropriate treatment plan, if necessary. You can contact your local Davey Tree office directly at (403) 250-5353. You can also complete a quick form for a consultation request on their local webpage here: http://www.daveytree.ca/local-offices/calgary-tree-service/. Best of luck to you, Leonard.
  • Leonard W August 5, 2018 >I live in Calgary Canada and planted an Elm tree in the spring. I have mulch around the tree and 2 quarts of water every two days. I am not sure how to recognize the health of the tree. There have been a few yellow leaves but the questions is regards to the leaves are curled in. Is that a health issue?
  • The Tree Doctor July 16, 2018 >Hi Malcolm, I would recommend that you contact a certified arborist and have them come out and take a look at your trees. They will be able to diagnose the issue(s) and prescribe a treatment plan accordingly. If you provide me with your zip code, I can see if Davey Tree services your area. If you would rather look for certified arborists or tree care companies elsewhere, here is a resource that can help you on your search: http://www.davey.com/arborist-advice/articles/hiring-a-tree-service-provider-or-an-arborist/. Hopefully, this helps. Best of luck to you, Malcolm.
  • Malcolm McCallum July 16, 2018 >I bought a dwarf grafted pear tree in feb 2018 had it in apot and 1 week ago transplanted to garden, leaves are going a bit brittle anda bit brown they where going like that before transplant and i also have 2cherry with holes in leaves can u help thanks
  • Michael MacPherson June 17, 2018 >You have been a great help, the tree still has a lot of green leaves on it, the leaves are turning yellow a little at a time, I at the same time planted a Plum tree and it also is getting yellow leaves. I will follow your advice and replant the trees with a little more room for the roots. Thank you for your help.
  • The Tree Doctor June 12, 2018 >Hi Lora, Newly planted trees sometimes take a bit longer to get started because of the loss of roots during the transplanting process. If the twigs are still green, you may have to give the tree a little more time. If the twigs begin to brown or fade to a lighter shade of green, there may be other issues that stem from how the tree was handled before or after planting. I suggest you document your tree with photos and show them to the nursery where you purchased the tree. Your tree may have a warranty period that will be honored by the selling party. Hopefully, this helps. Here if you any more questions, Lora.
  • The Tree Doctor June 11, 2018 >Hi Jim, Newly planted trees sometimes take a bit longer to get started because of the loss of roots during the transplanting process. If the twigs are still green, you may have to give the tree a little more time. If the twigs begin to brown or fade to a lighter shade of green, there may be other issues that stem from how the tree was handled before or after planting. I suggest you document your tree with photos and show them to the nursery where you purchased the tree. Your tree may have a warranty period that will be honored by the selling party. Hopefully, this helps. Best of luck to you Jim!
  • jim beene June 8, 2018 >newly plant bloodgood Japanese maple. Six foot high when purchased - looked very healthy when planted, however now the leaves are all wilted first and then drying up. Also, there is a yellow scale developing on the trunk and some of the branches. The trunk and all the limps seem to be alive and well. However the leaves are not falling off but soon will be. What is the best option for potentially salvaging this tree. I live in Owasso Oklahoma and the soil has a lot of clay. Jim Beene
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