The Proper Way to Mulch Your Trees

The Proper Way to Mulch Your Trees

The fresh spring air is finally starting to make its debut, and we’ll bet you’re itching to take a walk through your favorite outdoor spot.

The trees you see on your walk through the woods are not only a beautiful sight—they’re giving you a lesson to take back to your landscape!

Take a tip from trees in the natural setting when you tackle mulching. Proper tree mulching helps trees retain water, combat weeds and regulate soil temperature. Below, we answer the most common questions about how to apply mulch to trees.  

Should I spread my compost pile around trees and shrubs in spring? Then add mulch on top?

Yes. Spread compost around your plants, then let it work its way into the soil with rain or watering. Wait until a later date to apply mulch, keeping in mind our proper mulching methods below.

Our reader, Cynthia, recently asked this question. If you have any tree questions, post them in the comments section below, and we’ll get an answer for you shortly!

What is the best way to mulch a tree?

Spread 2 to 4 inches of mulch evenly around the perimeter of the tree. More info on that below!

The key is to let nature be your guide. Trees in a natural setting aren’t covered up to their trunks. A rule of thumb is to keep the trees’ root flare—the spot where the tree trunk ends and the roots begin—free of mulch.

Volcano mulching, or piling mulch up against the trunk or stem of a tree, creates a cool, damp hideaway that attracts fungus, disease and pests.

How much mulch should I apply to my trees?

2 to 4 inches of mulch layered around the base of your tree is all you need.

First, spread the mulch around your tree, then use a rake or shovel to evenly pull the mulch out to the furthest edges of the tree’s canopy.

Take a look at this Talking Trees video to see the process for yourself.

Mulching is just one way to protect your plants in the growing season.

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  • Miles Danforth April 5, 2016 >Thanks for sharing as it is an excellent post would love to read your future post.
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