4 Tips on Caring for Newly Planted Trees

4 Tips on Caring for Newly Planted Trees

Think back to the day you planted your Arbor Day beauty.

You did your research to find the perfect planting spot for the perfect tree.

Soon, you took to digging (but of course, not too deep), planted your new tree and filled in the hole with soil to keep it up straight. You didn’t stop there, though. You mulched around it and topped it off with plenty of water.

Since then, you’ve been admiring the beautiful tree that will offer benefits for years to come.

So, now what? Find all the tips you need for caring for newly planted trees below.

Any tips for watering a new tree?

Newly planted trees are under stress due to their new environment, so they’ll need extra love and care! Proper watering is essential to bringing moisture and oxygen to your trees’ roots.

During the first two weeks, deeply water young trees every day. Then, water a new tree once a week for the first year, while it still has its leaves. Be sure to take rainfall into account before watering, too.

Of course, during hot, dry periods, water more frequently.

How should I mulch my new tree?

Mulch is just what new trees need to retain moisture, control soil temperature and ward off weeds.

You want to avoid piling on too much mulch, though. Known as volcano mulching, this creates a cool, damp environment, which can attract fungi, pests and diseases. All of these factors stress out your new tree.

Instead, mulch your trees the right way! Begin by choosing the best mulch for trees… organic mulch.

Then, apply 2 to 4 inches of mulch around the tree’s drip zone, which is as far as the tree’s leaves grow out. Use a rake to pull mulch 1 to 2 inches from the tree trunk to provide proper air circulation.

What do I need to know about pruning new trees?

It’s important to trim away minor branch defects at the time of planting, but hold off on pruning young trees for at least a year.

Significantly trimming trees in the middle of the growing season can limit their growth potential next year.

When should I be fertilizing newly planted trees?

At Davey, we fertilize with Arbor Green PRO®. Since this is a slow-release, low-burn fertilizer, you don’t have to worry about when to fertilize.

Our fertilizer can be applied at any time – even on newly planted trees. This way, you’ll replenish nutrients that are generally lacking in our yard’s soil.

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  • The Tree Doctor September 28, 2016 >Hi there, Roger! Nice to meet another avid gardener and tree protector! Thank you for always recommending Davey when you can. Glad we've proven to you over the years how we can best care for your trees. Speaking of which, you should be able to buy Davey's Arbor Green fertilizer at your local SiteOne. You can find your closest store here: siteone.com/home/locations.aspx. If you have any fertilizer questions along the way, give your local arborist a call at 970.682.7991.
  • Roger Heins September 27, 2016 >I'm a Colorado Master Gardener and volunteer regularly on the Extension Tree Team. Whenever I'm called to investigate a tree problem and find that the condition and solution is beyond the home owners capabilities I Always recommend they seek a certified arborist. I'm not allowed to make a recommendation, but if asked: "whom do you use for a CA?" I have to be honest and say, " Davey". My question is, can I purchase your Arbor Green Pro fertilizer and applied it on my own trees (I have 22 of them)? I do utilize a Davey Arborist for pruning and evaluations, but I feel capable of applying fertilizer. Just checking and hoping I can purchase your great product. Thank you. Roger
  • The Tree Doctor August 22, 2016 >Hi there, Christine. Glad you reached out to Davey Tree for help! We talked to our scientists at the Davey Institute to help pinpoint a number for you. Properly watered with at least an inch-equivalent in a three-foot radius every week for nine months for all 30 trees is about 20,000 gallons of water per year. Multiply that by the local rate for water usage to find a price. Then, add the cost of gator bags for each tree (usually $20-$35 per bag). Watering would be necessary the first year and recommended the second, too. Plan on watering the trees one year for every diameter inch at planting to get them established. There is usually no need to water evergreen trees from at least December 1st – March 1st. Let me know if you have any more questions!
  • Christine McKenna August 18, 2016 >State is going to take some of my property to expand the road. I'll get some money to replace trees but I want to ask for money for water to keep them alive. So, how much water will 19 Green Giant arborvitae and 11 white pines need?
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