What You Need to Know about Watering Trees in Winter (Even in Colorado!)

What You Need to Know about Watering Trees in Winter (Even in Colorado!)

Even though trees look like they’re hibernating all winter, tree roots still grow a bit during winter!

Does that mean trees need you to provide water all winter long?

Read on to learn if you should water newly planted trees or established trees in winter. If you live in Colorado, the rules for watering trees are a bit different since the conditions are unique!

 

Your Guide to Watering Newly Planted and Mature Trees in Winter

Should you water newly planted trees in winter?

Generally, if you live in a place with a snowy season, you don’t need to water newly planted trees in winter. Instead, the trick is to make sure your tree has enough water right before winter–usually around late October or early November. That way, your tree is fully loaded before the ground freezes, and you don’t have to water again until early spring.

But, if the winter weather is super mild and the ground isn’t frozen, you can top your trees off with a bit more water if they need it. Evergreens, especially, can get thirsty in the winter. That’s one of the reasons you’ll see brown needles on your evergreen in the winter, so put them at the top of your watering list. And do this check before overloading an already-hydrated tree.

Another exception? If you’re in a drought and the temperature is above freezing, you should also plan on giving your trees a deep watering once or twice a month. Click here to find out if your region is suffering from drought.

Do your established, mature trees need water in winter, too?

If your winter is mild, you’re in a drought, or your evergreen is turning brown, check if your mature trees could use some water. Otherwise, you’re probably good!

Let’s get regional! Should you be watering trees in winter in Colorado?

If you live in Colorado, you know trees need special care. Even with all the snow, your trees get very little water from it. We’re talking 0.5” of water for every 12” of snow. That means the winters are dry.

“When the temperature rises above 40°, get out there and water your trees. Start with your most critical, and work your way around as time allows,” advises Kevin Marks of our North Denver, Colorado office. “You’re not going to over water your trees in our winter!”

Ready to water? Use these step-by-step instructions to water your tree just right!!

 

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