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Some fast-growing trees can sprout upwards of two feet per year. And, some hungry deer can chomp off a good chunk of a tree in just a few months.

In winter, a deer’s preferred meal is hard to come by. So naturally, they take a bite out of our trees when there’s not much else to choose from. That begs the question, are there any trees deer won’t damage in the desperate dead of winter?

Below, read about what to do if you’re looking for a quick-growing tree that deer won’t chow down.

What Tree Can I Plant That a Deer Will Not Eat and Destroy? (Pine, Spruce, Fir)

No tree is truly “deer resistant,” but there are a few types that deer typically steer clear of.

Quick Growing, Deer-Resistant Trees

Fruits, nuts and flower buds make up the bulk of a deer’s diet. But, those options are scarce for part of the year, and so deer feed on tree buds and bark instead. Any tree is better than going hungry, but if they can help it, deer usually avoid:

  • Plants with either prickly or hairy leaves
  • Plants with particularly strong scents (which also have a strong and not-so-great taste)
  • Plants that produce thick latex or sap

Deer-Resistant Evergreen Trees

Try out one of these fast-growing spruce or cedar trees for a quick addition to your landscape that likely won’t attract deer.

  • Eastern red cedar (zones 2-9): A tall evergreen with gray-blue fruit and silvery bark.
  • Norway spruce (zones 3-7): A pyramid-shaped tree with cascading branches of dark green needles.
  • Deodar cedar (zones 7-9): A perfect privacy-screen tree with greenish-silver foliage.

Deer-Resistant Landscape Trees

Protect your tree buds from snacking deer by choosing one of these quick-growing options that deer tend to stay away from.

  • Paper birch (zones 2-7): A delicate tree with thin white bark and bright yellow fall foliage.
  • Mimosa tree (zones 6-10): An ornamental tree with fluffy and bright pink flowers.
  • Tulip tree (zones 4-9): A tree with vibrant yellow and tulip-shaped flowers in fall.
  • River birch (zones 4-9): A glossy-leafed tree with paper-like tan bark that peels in layers.
  • Pawpaw tree (zones 5-8): A tropical tree with large fruits that taste like a banana-mango hybrid.

Give your tree an extra line of protection with these deer browsing prevention tips.

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