Davey Tree Service Blog: Tree Care Tips & Checklists

  • How to Choose the Best Tree for a Tree Swing

    Summer is here! That means children are out of school and ready to play. What better way to bring joy to your children than a hand-crafted tree swing? Turn your landscape into a playground where kids can run freely, swing high into the trees and enjoy summer’s warm and playful spirit. Below, Greg Mazur, department manager at the Davey Institute, shares his advice on how to pick the perfect tree for your tree swing. Here are Mazur’s Top 3 Tips for Tree Swing Success:

    1. Pick A Well Established Tree. Mazur suggests scoping your landscape for an older, well-established tree that is very sturdy and strong. A newly planted tree will not be able to withstand the swing’s weight, affecting its growth and health for years to come.

    “It's not a matter of just going outside and selecting a tree and attaching the swing,” Mazur says. “They have to be planted decades in advance.”

    Read More
  • The Comeback Champion Tree That Never Gives Up

    The Finger Lakes’ wine country native black locust has been on and off the National Big Tree Program’s list of champions for the last 39 years. Reclaiming its title in 2014, the tree is once again the largest black locust in the U.S. A Champion Black Locust Located: Dansville, New York America’s biggest black locust tree stands in the front yard of a residence in the Finger Lakes wine country. Each spring, thousands of snowy-white, fragrant floral clusters emerge on the grapevines nearby, luring a cloud of honeybees, creating a picturesque scene.

    First identified as a champion in 1975, this black locust proudly held the title until 2012. Fighting to regain its worthy award, this grandiose locust made a comeback on the 2014 list. At 99 feet tall with a 72-feet wide canopy, we hope this champion tree reigns for years to come.

    For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including this come-back-tree, the champion black locust.

    Read More
  • Pick the Right Trees for Drought-Prone Landscapes

    The following blog post has been adapted from a piece Davey contributed to the Association of Professional Landscape Designers' (APLD) Spring 2015 issue of The Designer magazine. Persistent drought conditions across the southwestern U.S. illustrate the need for landscape designs that can endure harsh drying trends.

    The challenge lies in meeting low-water demands without sacrificing beauty or functionality.

    By choosing the right tree, you can create a landscape with all the benefits trees have to offer—even for clients located in hot, dry climates.

    Read More
  • The National Champion Tree of Coffee County, Georgia

    Trees scatter Coffee County's Lone Hill Cemetery, but Georgia's national champion eastern redcedar surely stands out among the rest--its crown spread reaches the equivalent of a quarter of a football field. For cemetery visitors, there's no mistaking this giant. Standing under the legendary redcedar, you're instantly encapsulated by its overwhelming open crown, providing leaves and shade all around you. This large, graceful redcedar grows 57 feet tall with a crown spread of more than 75 feet.

    For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National Big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including Georgia's national champion eastern red cedar tree. 

    Do you know a big tree you'd like to see recognized in American Forests' National Big Tree Program? Nominate it here!

    Read More

There are 25 posts tagged " types of trees". Click here to return to home page.

Request a consultation

What do you need services for?
Sorry, we can’t seem to find the zip code you specified. Our residential tree care offices may not service your area. If you believe this is an error, please try again. Need help? Email us at info@davey.com.
  • Email newsletter
  • Woodchips
*Please fill out all required fields.