Why Does My Tree Only Have Leaves on One Side?

Why Does My Tree Only Have Leaves on One Side?

One of the best parts of summer? Relaxing beneath trees’ cool, shady canopy.

But if your tree has no leaves on one side, your favorite summer spot looks far less appealing. Even worse, your tree is likely suffering.

What could be causing the lack of leaves?

Our reader, Jim, recently asked this question. “Half of one of my maple trees has leaves. The other half looks like it started, but then there is nothing. Is this normal due to a long winter? Is there a problem, or is the tree dying?”

Like Jim, you may be wondering why your tree is growing this way. Below we explore causes and solutions for trees not leafing out.

Only half of my maple tree has leaves. Is this a sign of maple decline?

Reduced leaf growth is a sign of a declining maple tree.

Other symptoms of maple tree dieback include:

  • Reduced twig growth

  • Small, dead branches in the upper tree canopy in late spring or early summer

  • Dead, brittle or decaying roots

  • Fall colored maple leaves in July or August

Over time, larger and more visible dead branches will appear, causing crown dieback in maple trees.

What causes trees to only have leaves on one side?

Consider what your tree was exposed to before its lack of leaf growth: Harsh weather? Insufficient planting space? A nearby construction project?

If your pre-construction planning didn't account for the safety of your trees, they could suffer. Construction damage can cause soil compaction and/or root damage to the tree.

Sparse leaves are also linked to abnormally cold winter temperatures and soil moisture. For example, frozen soil and frigid winds could cause one side of the tree to suffer more injury. A weakened tree is also more susceptible to diseases and pests.

Another cause of canopy thinning is girdling roots—which wrap around other roots or the tree’s trunk and cut off the flow of water and nutrients. When nutrient uptake is compromised, you’ll see the effects in the tree’s canopy.

What are the solutions for a tree that does not leaf out?

Be sure to treat your trees with water, fertilizer and pruning as part of their plant health care program.

Dig deeper into the best solution for your tree by requesting a tree inspection. Your local arborist will pinpoint the specific cause of tree decline and recommend treatment.

In the meantime, comment below with questions about leafless trees or tree decline. We’ll have an answer for you soon!  

  • The Tree Doctor June 30, 2016 >Hi there, Tim. Glad to hear you're looking out for your ash trees. Sorry to hear two other trees in your yard look like they're struggling. I've passed along your request to your local arborist, so they should be reaching out soon. If you want to contact them directly, give them a ring at 303.214.0383 or fill out this form: davey.com/local-offices/north-denver-tree-service/#main-form. Happy to help you care for your trees, Tim.
  • Tim Armitage June 27, 2016 >we have 10 big green ash trees that may need to be protected and also two large trees have a different problem?? I think frost got to them?? Can you come and look at my home and tell me what I need to do??
  • The Tree Doctor June 21, 2016 >Hi there, Anita. Thanks for reaching out to Davey for help. So sorry to hear your tree is struggling after being hit by lightning. It does sound like your maple tree, as you suspected, is in trouble. To decide whether your tree is dying or needs to be removed, have a local, certified arborist inspect the tree in person. This video should also help: http://www.davey.com/arborist-advice/video/talking-trees-when-is-it-time-to-remove-a-tree/ Best of luck to you, Anita.
  • Anita Carden June 19, 2016 >Our large maple tree was apparently struck by lightening about three years ago. At first we noticed a couple of dead branches, then several more last year. This year half of the tree has no leaves and appears dead. Is it just dying? Should we cut it down? It's right outside our living room window in a prominent spot in our yard. We can't figure out if there is any hope it will fill back out. It looks terrible the way it is.
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