Are Japanese Beetles Doing Damage to Your Tree Leaves?

Are Japanese Beetles Doing Damage to Your Tree Leaves?

As the summer heat hits, we take special care to maintain our trees. This way, they’ll hold on to their full canopy and radiant, seasonal glow all summer.

Unfortunately, there’s one summer pest that gives our trees just as much attention, but doesn’t treat them as kindly. Japanese beetles take over tree canopies on warm, sunny days.

You can control their damage, though, by detecting and acting quickly. Below discover what trees Japanese beetles do and don’t like to eat and how to get rid of this garden pest.

When do Japanese beetles arrive?

This pest emerges and attacks plants from mid-June to August.

What trees do Japanese beetles eat?

This pest does play favorites when it comes to trees. Here are a few tree types Japanese beetles love:

  • Crape myrtle
  • Birch
  • Littleleaf linden
  • Crabapple
  • Purple leaf plum
  • Japanese maple
  • Norway maple
  • Weeping cherry
  • Ornamental cherry

Are there Japanese beetle resistant trees?

Yes! There are a few trees Japanese beetles avoid:

  • Evergreens
  • Red maple
  • White oak
  • Red oak

How do Japanese beetles do damage to tree leaves?

These flying pests eat away chunks of tree leaves and flowers. Often, they’ll leave nothing more than the skeleton behind.

When a Japanese beetle infestation is severe, tree leaves may brown at the top of the canopy or leaves may drop prematurely.

How can I get rid of Japanese beetles on trees?

To prevent Japanese beetle tree damage, apply one or two treatments a few weeks apart between June and August.

Learn more about how to control Japanese beetles in your trees and garden here!

Add a comment:
Featured or Related Blog Posts
  • Heat Wave

    Heat wave.

    The term usually makes many people think of the tropics or the desert.

    But extreme heat has hit many areas hard so far this summer. Record highs have been broken in some cities, while others have seen their hottest temperatures since the 1980s.

    Read More
  • Forecast: Hot & Humid

    The air-conditioning is set on high. The fan is blowing in my face. And it feels so good, particularly since my dog and I were just panting within seconds of stepping out to a heavy wall of heat and humidity. His face tilts up to mine, happy for the nice, cool breeze. We face the facts together as I sip from a tall, cool glass of water and he laps up the same out of his bowl: Despite our yearning to enjoy the outdoors, it's hot. And it's hot in nearly every region of the country.

    There's simply no denying it: This summer's a scorcher. While it's difficult to find the motivation to open the door to the heat lingering in the air outside - let alone step out onto a dry, parched lawn - I brave the elements because I notice my trees need some TLC, too.

    It's difficult to imagine another day of 90-plus degree temperatures. So I can hardly imagine how my trees must feel as their roots cling to nothing but the dry soil, day after day.

    Read More
  • A Matter of Life & Death

    The first time I really noticed, it was a week before Mother's Day.

    Every year we invite the moms over for a brunch of crepes, fruit salad and mimosas. We were hoping for decent weather to enjoy the festivities out on the patio, so we were cleaning up the yard in preparation. We snagged those early weeds that sprouted, spread some new mulch in our flower beds and prepped our vegetable garden, including planting green beans, spinach and sugar snap pea seeds with the kids.

    By then, most of our trees had stretched and opened their leaves. In the front, the red maples and the oaks were full of green leaves, and the weeping cherries and crabapples were in bloom with white and pink flowers. The 'Cleveland' pears that line the street were also showing their tiny white blossoms.

    Read More
  • Summer Sizzles

    Summer is a great time for picnics, barbecues and outdoor parties and games.

    During this hot summer with drought reaching 21st century highs in many U.S. regions, homeowners enjoying their backyards are also asking a lot of questions about how to care for their landscapes in these extreme conditions.

    Here are some of the recent questions Davey tree doctors have been asked through our partnership with American Forests. We hope the answers to these common questions help you as you care for your landscapes this season.

    Read More
  • Summer Tree Care Checklist: 3 Steps to Tree Safety this Season

    Imagine if we could ask our trees what comes to mind when they think summer. Drought stress. Storm damage. Pesky insects.

    Luckily, there are steps we can take to ensure they remain happy and healthy during the season.

    Read More

Request a consultation

What do you need services for?
Sorry, we can’t seem to find the zip code you specified. Our residential tree care offices may not service your area. If you believe this is an error, please try again. Need help? Email us at info@davey.com.
  • Email newsletter
  • Woodchips
*Please fill out all required fields.