The 5 To-Do's to Mark Off Your Spring Tree Care Checklist

The 5 To-Do's to Mark Off Your Spring Tree Care Checklist

When winter woes bring you down, think spring! Plan for a happy, healthy growing season using the five tips below.

Safeguarding the health of your trees means seasonally tending to your landscape. And, it never hurts to plan ahead.

Don’t wait until it’s too late! Start inspecting your trees now, then enjoy the benefits of your planning, hard work and dedication come spring.

Tackle your spring tree and landscape care checklist with our top 5 tips for the upcoming season!

The Top 5 Tips for Spring Landscape Bliss:

1. INSPECT trees and shrubs.

As we approach winter’s meltdown, our landscape may encounter standing water and/or flood damage. Act now to help prevent damage to your landscape. Start inspecting your critical risk trees for pest damage and aging. If you are not sure about necessary tree treatment procedures or care, seek a professionally trained arborist for assistance.

2. PRUNE dead branches. 

Trees, like humans, age over time and may develop bumps and bruises along the way. Winter’s wind and snow damage takes a toll on trees. Start protecting your trees with proper pruning techniques—out with old branches, in with new growth.

3. PLANT new trees.

Spring into action to make an economically and environmentally smart decision to plant a tree this coming season.

Trees:                                                           

  • Increase property values.
  • Reduce noise levels.
  • Absorb carbon dioxide.
  • Reduce air temperature and humidity.
  • Decrease energy consumption.
  • Stabilize soil by controlling wind and water erosion.
  • Provide habitat for wildlife.

Follow the “right tree, right place” principles and watch your new tree grow and flourish.

4. MULCH your landscape. 

Adding mulch to your landscape can bring a rich accent to any flower bed or tree. Not to mention, it secures the organic matter trees need beneath the soil surface. Follow these simple guides to conserve soil moisture and control weeds with proper mulching techniques.

5. FERTILIZE your plants.

Your trees and plants are hungry for nutrients and vitamins after the winter months. Watch your plants before your trees and shrubs enter peak growing season, then apply a slow-release fertilizer to not only replace nutrients, but also to improve plants’ resistance to damage from diseases, insects and stressful weather.

Springing for more? Download our full spring tree care checklist, and watch our spring landscape how-to videos for more information and expert advice.

Interested in a free spring landscape inspection? Contact your local Davey arborist today to schedule an appointment.

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