In 2016, much of the eastern half of the U.S. experienced sunny skies and warm weather throughout the late fall and early winter instead of the typical frigid temperatures and snow. Weather reports galore declared that some areas broke record high temperatures.

When unseasonably warm weather like this occurs, you may not think the warmer weather calls for complaint; however, it’s a different story for your plants.

Spring blooming plants may have opened into partial or full flowers due to unusually warm weather in late fall and winter. Additionally, some woody plants may have grown fresh leaves.

If your plants have experienced untimely growth through a warm winter, there are a few things you should keep in mind.

Plants may not experience spring growth this year  

Unseasonable weather tricks some plants into blooming prematurely. If plants budded during late fall and early winter, this means no blooming in the coming spring season.

Some plants may only partially bloom in the above average temperatures; however, this growth will still reduce the quantity and quality of the plant’s spring bloom.

Weather shifts leave long-term effects

Shifting from a period of warm temperatures to the teens and single digits could injure susceptible plants. Plants that have partially leafed out or budded can be stricken with dead or dying tips due to the drastic change. 

Not all plants are affected equally

Many factors influence plant injury in unusual weather conditions. Plants can experience different outcomes based on plant species, cultivar, health, location and exposure.

Though nothing can be done to prevent or reverse premature blooming, the onset of the spring season will reveal how specific plants have been affected.

Scheduling a spring checkup with your local arborist will help you determine the best course of action for your plants.  

Related Blog Posts

Snow Mold
Lawn Care & Maintenance

What Is This Whitish Gray (Or Whitish Pink) Fuzz On My Grass?

What is snow mold? It's a fungal disease that can create patches of whitish gray or whitish pink grass blades in late winter and early spring. Let's talk about how to prevent snow mold and how to get rid of snow mold in your home lawn.
Read More
Snow On Redbud Tree Davey Tree
Plant Health Care

Does a Late Spring Frost or Snowfall Damage Trees?

Learn more about late spring frost damage including maple, redbud, lilac, magnolia and japanese maple tree frost damage and why japanese maples lose leaves after a late spring frost
Read More

Sign Up For Free Tree & Landscaping Tips! 

Subscribe to the "The Sapling," the Davey Blog's email newsletter, for the latest tips to keep your outdoor space in tip-top shape throughout the year.

Plus, receive a free instant download of our landscape seasonal checklists when you sign up!

Get In Touch With Us!

We pride ourselves at Davey Tree on providing prompt, professional and personalized service from certified arborists that live, work and engage in your community. Contact one of our Davey Tree specialists for your residential, commercial, utility, or environmental needs.

Let's Find What
You're Looking For!