Protect Your Trees from El Niño's Elements

Protect Your Trees from El Niño's Elements

In 1997, the world experienced what was called “the strongest El Niño event since the 1950s.” As we transition into winter and the New Year, scientists predict we will see history repeat itself with some of the strongest El Niño effects on record.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the memorable weather patterns of the 1997 El Niño are making a comeback in California. The state is expected to experience El Niño’s peak from January to March. The forecast? Mudslides, heavy rainfall, and a cycle of one storm after another.

Along with these record-high rains come recurring threats to your trees: weak branches can fall in severe weather, damaging power lines, homes and property.

For the questions that may be crossing your mind about keeping your trees and property safe, take a look at these steps for taking on El Niño.

How do I know if my tree is at risk?

California’s drought season caused many trees to loose strength and vigor, leaving them vulnerable to El Niño’s forecasted elements. Drought stressed trees have browning leaves that appear wilted or scorched, a thin canopy and dead or dried branches.

How can I prevent potential damage before the heavy storms?

Providing your trees with a timely, professional pruning can help manage growth, reduce potential for storm damage and eliminate dangerous limbs. In this video, Nick Crawford, sales arborist for Davey’s San Francisco office, explains why now is the ideal time for preventative pruning.

Will my tree need to be removed?

If you are concerned about a potential risk tree on your property, it is important to contact a certified arborist. For trees severely damaged by drought (which can be determined with a tree inspection) full removal may be necessary.

For additional questions or to request a consultation for preventative pruning, contact your local arborist.

 

Add a comment:
Featured or Related Blog Posts
  • Windy Cities

    When powerful winds come through with a storm like Hurricane Isaac, they can do more than just cause a bad hair day. They can delay flights, cause power outages and result in varying kinds of damage to trees, ranging from foliage loss to broken limbs.

    Trees differ in their ability to withstand strong winds. The density and strength of the wood, the branch structure and expanse of the roots are factors influencing wind tolerance.

    Ways to minimize storm damage to your trees include pruning to reduce deadwood and canopy density, along with installation of flexible steel support cables to strengthen weak or problematic branch unions. These are not a guarantee but are proven to minimize wind damage.

    Read More
  • Speaking Tree

    One of my New Year's resolutions is to learn a new language. I work with several arborists fluent in Spanish, and they've inspired me. I've purchased audio aids, manuals, and am even enrolled in a Spanish class at a local community college. Well, it turns out that this is much harder than the commercials make it sound.

    As I was absorbing Spanish on my way into work yesterday, it occurred to me that our trees communicate through their own language. They have something to tell us, but we have to be able to understand them. This is one language I am comfortable speaking, so when my landscape wakes from its winter slumber, I'll be ready to listen. Here are a few pointers from my experience as a landscape interpreter:

    First, listen for obvious cries for help. Are there any dead or dying limbs, branches that may have broken or split during the harsh winter?  If so, prune out the dead tissue to support healthy growth and prevent injury to anyone who might be passing under the tree. Be on the lookout for damage from animals feeding on buds, bark below the snow line, twigs, and small branches. Even if you're new to "speaking tree," trust your instincts here; if something looks wrong, you may have a problem.

    Read More
  • Fear of the Swarm

    Within the past few weeks, we've finally witnessed some consistency among the temperatures we experience day-to-day. They have warmed, telling us summer is near, and, at last, we can breathe a sigh of relief.

    But just when we assume summer will wash all our worries away, the creepy crawlies that have burrowed beneath our landscapes for nearly two decades detect that same warmth and emerge, their metallic tin-pan shriek reminding us that our trees might require a bit of extra attention.

    Once the ground temperature reaches above 64 degrees, 13- to 17-year-old periodical cicada broods surface from below to breed. We expect a majority of this year's cicada brood - which could contain millions of cicadas that emerge in the same synchronized generation - to affect trees within states along the East Coast. States that predict an encounter with an excessive cicada population include Connecticut, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, as well as Washington, D.C.

    Read More
  • 20/20 Vision

    I could stare at fall foliage for hours at one time, mesmerized by its variety and vibrancy.

    It's exciting to witness the transformation from a lustrous, yet static, bright green canopy to a cornucopia of color among the leaves. The warmer shades of the color spectrum begin to take over, with a few glimpses of purples and plums sprinkled in throughout the leafy scenery.

    But when the winds begin to pick up, even the slightest breeze detaches a few fragile leaves from surrounding tree branches - one by one - gradually revealing the bark and hinting winter is near.

    Read More
  • Shaping Up a Shaken Site

    When heavy winds and rain and bouts of hot, humid air subside, it's the perfect time to take advantage of the otherwise pleasant summertime conditions and enjoy what your favorite local park has to offer.

    Whether you're seeking a shaded spot on the ground to settle into your favorite book, an open lawn for impromptu ball games, or a scenic view of the town, parks provide us with a variety of special places and spaces for countless seasonal activities. But without a bit of extra TLC, the grass grows a little less green, the tree tops tremble a bit in the breeze and sometimes, the most invasive plants take over the land you look forward to frequenting through the end of summer's sunshine.

    That's when local arborists can help. The tree care skills and abilities demonstrated by Guy Pardee, district manager with The Care of Trees, a subsidiary of The Davey Tree Expert Company, when a local park grew awry, for example, offered a solution to restoring one of park lovers' most prized local getaways for the sake of increased future visitations and enjoyment.

    Read More

Request a consultation

What do you need services for?
Sorry, we can’t seem to find the zip code you specified. Our residential tree care offices may not service your area. If you believe this is an error, please try again. Need help? Email us at info@davey.com.
  • Email newsletter
  • Woodchips
*Please fill out all required fields.