A Giant Sequoia Tree Honors General Sherman

A Giant Sequoia Tree Honors General Sherman

This American Forests champion tree stands more than 270 feet tall in Sequoia National Park, California, and is named General Sherman after American Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman. 

Stand at its 102-foot wide trunk, crane your neck as far skyward as you can and you'll just begin to see this giant sequoia's majestic lower leaves emerge. Years ago, in 1879, this giant was already taller, bigger and more magnificent than the rest.

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For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National Big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including Sequoia National Park's national champion giant sequoia tree.

Do you know a big tree you'd like to see recognized in American Forests' National Big Tree Program? Nominate it here!

  • The Tree Doctor May 26, 2015 >Thank you for sharing, M.D.!
  • M. D. Vaden May 25, 2015 >One coast redwood found last year may tie General Sherman for points. About 20% chance presently, but almost inevitable in the near future given the size and growth rate of the Sequoia sempervirens. Search "redwoods' & "year of discovery".
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