Davey Sponsors American Forests National Register of Big Trees for 25 Years

Davey Sponsors American Forests National Register of Big Trees for 25 Years

To discover a big tree is a big deal. But that's no news to American Forests.

In fact, the organization has recognized hundreds of giant trees from all over the country in its biannual publication, the National Register of Big Trees. Nearly 800 trees exist in the register to date--786 total specimens that have wowed witnesses with their sizes, shapes and structures.

American Forests, the oldest national nonprofit conservation organization in the country, initiated the National Big Tree program more than 70 years ago. Its purpose? "To preserve and promote the iconic stature of these living monarchs;" as well as support the organization's advocacy for the protection and expansion of forests.

La Pine Giant La Pine State Park
La Pine Giant, the largest ponderosa pine tree in the U.S., located in La Pine State Park, Ore.

But the National Big Tree program accomplishes so much more than that. It educates communities about how such impressive trees and the forests in which they stand can help sustain a healthy environment; education Davey recognizes and values as the premiere sponsor of the program.

This year marks the 25th year Davey has sponsored American Forests' National Big Tree program. To better illustrate and further recognize national champion trees nominated every year, the two organizations have collaborated on the National Register of Big Trees Calendar: An annual 12-month depiction of some of the most impressive trees to recently receive national recognition.

Let me introduce you to the national champion featured for the month of January 2014:

"LA PINE GIANT" EARNS RECOGNITION. American Forests' 2014 National Register of Big Trees Calendar features "La Pine Giant," a nickname for the champion ponderosa pine hailing from Oregon's La Pine State Park. Originally nominated in 1945, the giant celebrates regaining the national champion title it lost in 1998 this year.

La Pine Giant Big Tree
The American Forests National Register of Big Trees lists La Pine Giant, a ponderosa pine.

The tree seemed as if it was dying to visitors nearly 20 years ago, when storms had damaged and removed some of its upper branches. But the tree continues to impress more recent passersby since its rediscovery as an abundance of green foliage, and a healthy number of cones continue to emerge from its canopy.

Now, at more than 500 years old, La Pine Giant can't be missed at its location near the Deschutes River in Central Oregon. It measures approximately 167 feet tall, 68 feet across and 348 inches around. That's one Big Tree!

THINK BIG. You can look out for more Big Trees on our blog throughout the year! In the meantime, share your favorite tree photos with us-just send an email to blog@davey.com with your photo and a brief description and we'll share it here! Happy Big Tree hunting!

Have a big tree you think needs some TLC? Contact your local Davey professionally trained arborist for a free consultation.

Add a comment:
Featured or Related Blog Posts
  • The Legendary Champion White Oak Lives On

    The Wye Oak State Park in Maryland once housed one of the most majestic white oaks of its time. This nearly 500-year-old tree lived a long and happy life until Mother Nature’s woes caused it to fall in 2002. Read below to find out how the legacy of this brilliant tree lives on today. Maryland’s former state tree, the enormous, regal white oak of Wye Oak State Park, dominated this spot for nearly 500 years, creating shade for surrounding structures built centuries later. In spite of its longevity, a severe and lethal summer storm felled the once mighty white oak in 2002—despite the fact that it had been cabled in the 1990s.

    In the tree’s heyday, it stood 96 feet high with an enormous 119 foot spread. To keep its legacy alive, a sprightly, young oak was planted within the former giant’s tree trunk.

    For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including the unforgettable, former champion white oak.

    Read More
  • The Comeback Champion Tree That Never Gives Up

    The Finger Lakes’ wine country native black locust has been on and off the National Big Tree Program’s list of champions for the last 39 years. Reclaiming its title in 2014, the tree is once again the largest black locust in the U.S. A Champion Black Locust Located: Dansville, New York America’s biggest black locust tree stands in the front yard of a residence in the Finger Lakes wine country. Each spring, thousands of snowy-white, fragrant floral clusters emerge on the grapevines nearby, luring a cloud of honeybees, creating a picturesque scene.

    First identified as a champion in 1975, this black locust proudly held the title until 2012. Fighting to regain its worthy award, this grandiose locust made a comeback on the 2014 list. At 99 feet tall with a 72-feet wide canopy, we hope this champion tree reigns for years to come.

    For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including this come-back-tree, the champion black locust.

    Read More
  • A "Royal" National Champion Tree Thrives Thanks to Davey's Care

    Through the years, the national champion royal paulownia tree standing outside Reitz Memorial High School in Indiana has received a lot of attention from students, faculty and local Davey arborists. The purple blooms of this champion royal paulownia tree emerge each spring outside an Indiana high school where it continually grows and inspires. Native to China, the tree was planted in Midwest America in 1926 to commemorate both the completion of Reitz Memorial High School, a catholic school, and to honor the community's first priest. Each year, graduating classes take their class photo beneath this tree's stately limbs. 

    Over the years, this tree has gotten by with a little help from its friends at Davey, who ensured it lived on thanks to cables and braces after storm damage in the 1990s.

    For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National Big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including Reitz Memorial High School's champion royal paulownia.

    Read More
  • A Giant Sequoia Tree Honors General Sherman

    This American Forests champion tree stands more than 270 feet tall in Sequoia National Park, California, and is named General Sherman after American Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman.  Stand at its 102-foot wide trunk, crane your neck as far skyward as you can and you'll just begin to see this giant sequoia's majestic lower leaves emerge. Years ago, in 1879, this giant was already taller, bigger and more magnificent than the rest.

    For 75 years, American Forests has identified the country’s largest native trees in order to preserve them and educate the public about their importance. To celebrate, and mark Davey’s 25th year partnering with American Forests, the 2015 National Big Tree Program Calendar features special champion trees from across the country, including Sequoia National Park's national champion giant sequoia tree.

    Do you know a big tree you'd like to see recognized in American Forests' National Big Tree Program? Nominate it here!

    Read More
  • Why Mother Nature Is No Match for the Tree Doctor

    One of the toughest battles landscapes face has to be the wrath of Mother Nature.

    Some days she brings calm winds, sunshine and peaceful skies. But other days, she erupts into an angry mass of dark clouds, unforgiving downpours and violent gusts.

    And, despite the best predictions, each year she always surprises us--whether it's with a dangerous drought, a robust flood or a severe snowstorm.

    Read More

Request a consultation

What do you need services for?
Sorry, we can’t seem to find the zip code you specified. Our residential tree care offices may not service your area. If you believe this is an error, please try again. Need help? Email us at info@davey.com.
  • Email newsletter
  • Woodchips
*Please fill out all required fields.