Budding Artists

Budding Artists

Old Man Winter may have overstayed his welcome, but spring's light, breezy character has gradually swept him away - the gray cloud cover that shadowed us for months has been lifted at last.

And, there you have it - a clean slate.

With the soundtrack of chirping young birds ringing in her ears, Mother Nature gently rustles the branches that form the brown, barren canopies above. She wakes them from the dormant state they've endured all winter long.

Alert and anxious to greet the new season, small twigs eagerly spring up to face the warm sun rays. The increased, hurried activity encourages the branches, the bark and - finally - the buds, to break out of the deepest of their winter woes. The growing season is here.

pink tree bud
Ruud Morijn - Fotolia.com

A few strokes of pale tones upon the undersides of flower petals and grass blades familiarize us with the new growth we've been more than ready to see. As the buds begin to break, tiny bits of color dot the canopies of your trees, reviving them from the still, dull canvas they've represented in past months. Now, the painted limbs dance on frequent breezes through the air, more than happy to rejoice in renewed freedom and joy.

April showers bring May flowers. As the old saying goes, this month promises to deliver the rainfall required to nourish your trees. Flower petals will peel away from the cocoon-like structure in which they've cultivated rich, fresh color. Prominent clusters of blossoms will emerge from the canopy, mingling with the tiny green leaves all around. Mature flowers will develop bright, bold shades soon after to exaggerate spring's flair.

spring blossoms scene
line-of-sight - Fotolia.com

And come mid-April or May, Mother Nature will reveal a true masterpiece right before your eyes - a masterpiece no famous artist can ever quite replicate via paper, pencil or paint. All at once, the beautiful scenery of pinks, violets and whites bursting from the new blossoms on your trees will introduce you to the palette of color Mother Nature beholds.

Regardless if Mother Nature has yet to color your world, take advantage of that clean slate she has provided and inspect your trees and landscape for problems areas that may delay the vibrant pop of color you're looking for. Then, you can look forward to some warmer weather and more time to enjoy the presence of your trees this spring.

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