Tree Care Boot Camp

Tree Care Boot Camp

For the past four weeks, 49 Davey employees have been in the trenches.

They've left their homes and families from across the U.S. and Canada and journeyed to the company's corporate headquarters in Kent, Ohio, for an intensive month of training at The Davey Institute.

Days and weeks are long - 11-hour days, six days a week.

Sessions are intensive. They dive into courses on a variety of tree topics from troubleshooting problems to cabling to climbing techniques to insects. Courses are taught by entomologists, ornithologists, horticulturists, plant pathologists and master arborists, among others. They leave no informational tree stone unturned.

By completing this rigorous course and field work held exclusively for Davey employees, they absorb expert knowledge, study hard, take challenging tests and become graduates of The Davey Institute of Tree Sciences (DITS), which has existed for 103 years dating back to Davey founder John Davey.

Then, these graduates get to apply their skills in their daily work lives to excel in the field of arboriculture and landscape care.

Congratulations to the 2012 DITS class!

  • Jammie Silvus January 5, 2013 >Do you keep records of past DITS classes I graduated in 1995 and would like to catch up with old friends
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